Licentiate Column 28/11/13: Christmas Party Dress Guilt

HELLO,  stock photo for 'guilt'!

HELLO, stock photo for ‘guilt’!

So, here we are again.  Together we stand on the cusp of Christmas party season, facing bravely into the bitter wind that is trying to find the perfect party dress in a world that is jaded and blind to our sequin-wearing ways.

One of the things that pains me most at the moment is Party Dress Guilt, in which you go to find the perfect shiny/sparkly attire and find yourself buying nothing because it just so happens that clothes cost money, and money is something that you feel you should be spending on something more worthwhile than clothes.  Like the electricity bill. Or gin.

It doesn’t really matter whether you’re rich or poor, whether the party dress is Penneys or Proenza. The festive season has always had the tendency to remind the more neurotic people amongst us that the time period from early December to January is based on spending money on the Worst Thing Ever.  Fun.

You go home, and you don’t buy the dress, and still you feel bad for even thinking about buying the dress, because there are people suffering in other places.  Your best friend lost her job, your brother’s dole was cut, you’ve lost your medical card and there’s a new government levy on wine.  It doesn’t matter that you give money to charity.  It doesn’t matter that you can easily afford the dress (or in my case, a sequinned, on-sale pair of Topshop jeans), what matters is the frivolity.  Frivolity is bad.  Enjoying yourself?  BAD.

I never really understood Catholic guilt until my first financially independent Christmas. You feel absolutely terrible for buying a crushed velvet minidress with a ridiculously low cost-per-wear when you’ve only budgeted ten euro for family gifts. Maybe you settle, and buy something cheap and cheerful and wearable.  Then, you are subtly shamed when the family member with the good job buys you a present at five times your budget. Christmas is a minefield littered with good intentions and expensive eyeshadow palettes.

We feel like this for a good reason.  We should feel a bit guilty.  Christmas and the New Year is the time period for conspicuous consumption. Whether that consumption takes the form of food or clothing or slightly more illicit substances, it doesn’t really matter.  It all boils down to money anyway.  At least the clothes consumption won’t give you a heart attack, but ask me that again when I get my next credit card bill.

On the flip side, we need to slough some of the guilt off.  If, like me, you’re feeling guilty despite not actually buying anything, a reality check might be in order.  Can you afford it?  Good for you.  Maybe you should buy what you want without feeling bad. Your money is yours. However you decide to spread it around , at least make sure that this Christmas it’s money well spent.

 

Dublin’s Perfect Vintage…

… and luckily this vintage isn’t affected by the new wine tax.

Irene&RuthVintageSessions

Irene and Ruth of The Vintage Sessions

This Saturday is shaping up to be quite the vintage-themed cornucopia of festivities in our fair capital. At 11am the fabled Shutterbug Kilo Sale will commence at The Chocolate Factory. No appearance by Willy Wonka, I’m afraid – just rails and rails of clothes handpicked by the uber stylish (and just lovely) Blanaid and her team. Click here for details. Oh, and a word of advice – get there EARLY!

Form about 11 or so to 7pm, The Vintage Sessions are taking place in a beautiful Georgian house (The South William Space) on South William Street.  This is a full-on vintage experience.  Fifteen euros gets you in, gets you a vintage hair and make-up makeover, a mini photoshoot on a paper moon, cocktails and a market with some of the best vintage sellers in the country (I’m especially looking forward to perusing Om Diva and the winter selection by the lovely Olivia at Elsa and Gogo).  Did I mention that there will be vintage talks and presentations too?

*NERDGASM*  Here is the running order of talks and presentations for the day.

12.00 Panel Discussion - The Evolution of the Creative Quarter and the Rise of Vintage in the Area

13.00 Presentation – The Lost Fashion History of South William St by fashion historian Ruth Griffin

2.30 Presentation – 1940s Irish Fashion, by photo historian Orla Fitzpatrick

4.00 Presentation - Forgotten Irish Style Icons by fashion historian Ruth Griffin

5.15 Panel Discussion - Vintage in Ireland Today and why so many are choosing to turn their passion in to a career

Irene (in the photo above) will be MC-ing

Panelists include Ruth Ni Loinsigh (Om Diva and Creative Quarter board), Kathy Sherry (Dirty Fabulous), Garry O’Neill (author of the rather amazing Where Were You Dublin street style book) and yours truly.  I’ll be taking part in the final panel talk so if you’re coming, please do say hi!

There may also be Ukelele playing…

To get your tickets for the event, email thevintagesessions@gmail.com

Entrance to the Shutterbug Kilo Sale is free, gloriously FREE.

Licentiate Column 29/11/12: Vouchers for All, and to All a Good Night

Vouchers don’t always provoke this response, you know.

It is now the last week of November, so we have reached the third stage in the hellish Advent calendar titled ‘The Run-up to Christmas’. This is the part where you start to feel guilty about not having bought any presents yet – surprisingly, this is a good place to be. We still have another three stages to go, the final one culminating in fighting with panicked Secret Santa-ers over the last Ted Baker sock set in TK Maxx.

I am duty-bound to tell you what kind of party clothes to wear (sparkly over sheer) and what kind of lingerie to buy for your significant other (sheer over sparkly) but, in truth, the best Christmas present to buy pretty much anyone is a voucher (my preference is Amazon, being mercifully bereft of sheer or sparkly stuff).

It is hard to wrap a voucher – or surprisingly easy, depending on your outlook. On asking my sister for an Amazon voucher, she instead asked for a list of books that I wanted so she could wrap them herself. It seemed like an awful lot of effort to me when I could have just bought them myself with my voucher. Then again, I probably just need a Christmas special to warm my cold, dead heart.

They may seem like a bit of a cop-out, but I love getting vouchers as gifts. I am such a persnickety, contrary person that it’s often hard for loved ones to choose something for me. I also suffer from a condition known as ‘Weird Boob and Leg-itis’ which means that I’m such a strange shape that clothes rarely fit the way they should. If you need help with which vouchers to buy for who, I’m here for you.

The Cover All Bases Person – The Secret Santa person, the person who has eclectic but decidedly mainstream tastes, the vaguely trendy male cousins, the friend who is so worryingly preoccupied with her dress size that you are now scared to ask what it is – get an ASOS voucher. For those not in the know, ASOS is a global shopping platform with its own mainline range as well as a glut of other retailers. You can also support vintage sellers and just-got-started designers in their Marketplace section.

The Person Who’s Always Banging on About Needing Thermal Underwear – Marks and Spencer. People who think about thermals also think quite frequently about comfort food (I am one of these people) and Marks has an admirable selection of both.

The College Student – Topshop. Is an explanation necessary?

The Person Who has Recently Decided to Dress Like a Grown-Up - There is a crossroads in a woman’s life at the intersection of ‘Good Quality’ and ‘But I don’t Have Any Money’ and Cos is the recently-constructed bypass. The Swedish label sells its wares in Brown Thomas, so buy a BT voucher and point her in the right direction come January sales time.

For everyone else – a book token. Fashion can’t be the solution to every problem (but God knows at least I’m trying).