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Fashion, Film, Photography

New Fashion, Classic Films

The Autumn fashion issue of New York magazine (that’d be the one with Tavi on the cover then) has pulled off a Photoshop coup, pairing the stars of classic films with key A/W catwalk pieces. It’s gimmicky, I know, but photographer Bobby Doherty has, in some cases, pulled off a fairly seamless transition; a fashion between guilty pleasure and pure unabashed, unironic fun.Marlene in Balenciaga! Meryl in Burberry! Marilyn in Moschino! In a week of many deeply shitty happenings, this made me smile.

Much, much more over at The Cut.

Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz and Saint Laurent boots

Judy Garland in The Wizard of Oz and Saint Laurent boots

Catherine Deneuve in Belle De Jour and Dries Van Noten coat.

Catherine Deneuve in Belle De Jour and Dries Van Noten coat.

Brigitte Bardot in Contempt and Chanel scarf and top

Brigitte Bardot in Contempt and Chanel scarf and top

Tippi Hedren in The Birds and Moschino jumper and jacket

Tippi Hedren in The Birds and Moschino jumper and jacket

Liza Minnelli in Cabaret and Marc Jacobs dress

Liza Minnelli in Cabaret and Marc Jacobs dress

Gwyneth Paltrow in The Royal Tenenbaums. Coat by Valentino, bag by Hermès.

Gwyneth Paltrow in The Royal Tenenbaums. Coat by Valentino, bag by Hermès.

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Fashion, Film, The Reading List

Things to Read #10

Tears. Tears upon tears.

Tears. Tears upon tears.

Sometimes you mean to get your work done on a Sunday. Other times, you spend your Sunday lounging around in the sun, napping and glugging gin and tonics. Guess which one was done on Sunday.

When not glugging, I was having my heart ripped out by Before Midnight, the last in Richard Linklater’s film trilogy about seemingly perfect couple Celine and Jesse. This scene is why. Linklater kills.

Read every single article linked by this post on Gawker provocateur turned author Emily Gould and marvel at how one woman can provoke (and create) such a sheer amount of bile and resentment from otherwise reasonable adults. Links include a live-tweeted suicide intervention, which is one of the final symptoms of the Internet finally eating itself and an Elle profile that manages to be both cutting and strangely adoring – ironic, since the central theme of Gould’s newest novel, Friendship, is about, um,  female friendship.

The Independent republished Lynn Barber’s 1990 interview with Jimmy Savile and, in light of certain revelations, it’s an even more unsettling read than it was over two decades ago.

Badass bald women.

Arsenic dresses and the allure of poison clothes.

The secret history of Canadian TV show Fashion Television. With clips!

IFB’s look at why we click on a certain website’s links even though we don’t want to. Fall for the clickbait-y stuff every time.

GO AWAY, Robin Thicke. Or at the very least, take a sexual harassment course.

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Fashion, Film, Photography, The Reading List, Things to Read

Things to Read #2

Winona Ryder as Heathers' Veronica Sawyer by Mike Mitchell

Winona Ryder as Heathers’ Veronica Sawyer by Mike Mitchell

Teaching The Camera To See My Skin – Some aspects of photography are racist. I did not know that.

AnOther Loves Tattoos.

Kurt Cobain died twenty years ago yesterday. His vigil was a covert suicide prevention rally as well as a memorial.

Karl Lagerfeld has the be the most quotable fashion designer alive.

A 6,000 word dissection of 10 Things I Hate About You. You’re welcome.

My Dad sent me this review of the new Lydia Davis book, unaware that I already had a copy. Paternal synchronicity (seriously though, it’s a good book). Super short stories that cut to the bone and experiences that are so specific but so common that you think Davis could be writing just for you and your weird little brain.

An Oral History of Heathers, one of the best teen movies ever made. Bonus points for Winona Ryder trying to sell Heathers 2 to Meryl Streep (co-starring Meryl as the First Lady) while filming in an rural Portugal, where Ryder knew Streep would have no escape.

Lest we forget though, Heathers was a biting satire with a serious amount of disgust for its characters.

Sex Ed for Boys. Communication, communication and more communication.

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Art, Fashion, Film, The Reading List, Things to Read

Things to Read #1

Anatomical collages by Travis Bedel (Colossal)

Anatomical collages by Travis Bedel (Colossal)

Things have been a bit, um, stilted on the blog front recently.

Ever since I stopped writing my column, I’ve been at a bit of a loss. Should I still blog? And if so, what should I write about? One of the simplest things to remember about blogging is that you should probably love it. You should love writing or taking photos or making videos and you should love sharing your thoughts, quirks and the cool things you pick up along the way.

I’ve come to a point, after moving countries and going back to university and getting a new job and dying my hair alternately blue, green and a bruise-ish violet, where I’m at a crossroads. One point, four different directions and no real idea where I’ll end up. More to the point, no idea where this blog will end up.

The trick, really, is to find your niche.

The only thing I did with real regularity, apart from the column, was book reviews. So, Im going to keep doing that.

Over the past year or so, I’ve been getting into longreads; real, meaty articles that are the total opposite of the thoughtless, bland, soundbites that make up a huge chunk of internet journalism. Damn our goldfish memories. Every Sunday, I read Ana Kinsella’s clicks and, for half an hour or so – usually over a pot of tea and a jam donut – I get sucked into a Good Reading vortex. I highly, highly, recommend checking her Tumblr out. She’s a smashing writer too.

When I’m tootling around on the internet and I find something I know I’d like to read in real depth, I save it on Instapaper for later. So, in the spirit of sharing, and because Ana is OK with me blatantly copying her, here are some things to read. This will probably be sporadic (as soon as the Instapaper filing cabinet is full, I’ll write another post), but we’ll see how we go.

The Surrealist Ball, 1972 (So Bad, So Good)

The Surrealist Ball, 1972 (So Bad, So Good)

‘The Devil and the Art Dealer’ – Vanity Fair. “The artworks stolen from the Jews are the last prisoners of WWII. You have to be aware that every work stolen from a Jew involved at least one death.” 1,280 works of art, originally stolen by the Nazis, were recovered in an apartment in Munich a few months ago. The billion dollar hoard includes works by Picasso, Brancusi, Otto Dix, Oscar Kokoschka… pretty much every European early twentieth century painter of note, plus a few Old Masters. Because what’s an art hoard without a Canaletto?

‘Geek Love at 25: How a Freak Family Inspired Your Pop Culture Heroes’ - Wired. Geek Love is one of two books that every person I have ever lent it to, without exception, loved (the other one being ‘Rip it up and Start Again’ by Simon Reynolds). Read this, then read the book. And if you’ve already read the book, read it again.

‘Why are We Obsessed with 90’s Film Fashion?’ – Never Underdressed. An interview with Elizabeth Sankey.

‘Simone Rocha: Just a Little Bit of a Lady’ – The Telegraph. Man, she’s cool.

The Vintage Black Glamour book is one to look forward to (Miss Moss)

The Vintage Black Glamour book is one to look forward to (Miss Moss)

The Detective Wore Prada’ – The Guardian. Guardian writers share their best-dressed of the small screen.

‘Are Celebrities the New Fashion Critics?’ – Style.com. A big, fat, resounding ‘NO’ is the answer here.

‘Showgirls is a Good Movie’ – The Awl. It’s VERSAYCE! Heh. I love Showgirls, though that pool sex scene with Jessi Spano and FBI Special Agent Dale Cooper still gives me the the willies.

‘The Grand Budapest Hotel: The Amazing Backstories Behind Ten Memorable Props’ – Paper.

The Irish Boys of Central Saint Martins – The Irish Times. I interviewed three really, properly, achingly talented Irish fashion grads for this article.

‘How American Pageants are Turning Politics into a Beauty Parade’ – The New Statesmen. It seems that the average American beauty queen can easily segue into a career in politics. Hmm. A big, fat, hmm.

‘Amazing Structure: A Conversation With Ursula Franklin’ – The Atlantic. Scientist, feminist and an all-around remarkable woman.

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Art, Film, Subculture

Andy Warhol at The Mac

Family trips are a rare thing. With two siblings not living in the same area as the rest of the family, it can be tricky to get together. When we do meet up, it’s usually six hours in the car, followed by food, followed by food coma. Lather, rinse, repeat.

Last weekend the family went to Belfast. Highlights included food in Made in Belfast and Alley Cat, the cheapy cheap euro to sterling rate in Topshop and the Andy Warhol retrospective in The Mac, to which I dragged my mother and little brother – in his case a little literal dragging was needed.

The Mac is a lovely arts venue, but to call this a retrospective is a bit of a misnomer – there just aren’t enough major works in too small a space to make it a real reflection of the prolific Warhol. It’s really more of a sampling. However, the exhibition is totally free, so if you’re in the area before the 28th of April, when the exhibition ends, it’s more than worth a look. They’ve got great merchandise too (she said, sipping tea from her new Warhol cow print mug).

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Fashion, Film

Prada Candy – A Pastel Daydream

It’s Easter Sunday, and if you’re anything like me you’re forgoing the obligatory bank holiday pub blow out for another slice of delicious, delicious meringue.

The new Prada Candy films are just one more slice of sweetness for the hungry palette. Starring Léa Seydoux and directed by Wes Anderson and Roman Coppola, it’s a) very cool and b) very French in that there’s a fair amount of drama but no discernible conclusion but everyone retains their sense of louche fabulousness – feel free to argue with me on that point.

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Fashion, Film, Subculture

The Face of Modern Street Style

TAKE MY PICTURE from GARAGE Magazine on Vimeo.

Have you seen Take My Picture yet? If not, take nine minutes out of your evening and watch it – it’s very illuminating.

Featuring Tim Blanks, Tommy Ton and Susie Bubble, this Garage Magazine-commissioned mini-doc explores the street style phenomenon as it exists today.

Regardless of whether you think street style is the modern runway or a load of old hooey (or, like me, you think it’s a bit of both) there’s a new insight to be gleaned after watching this.

And at least if you don’t learn anything, you’ll get to see Anna Dello Russo briskly walking in circles for Tommy Ton’s benefit. More entertaining than it sounds, I promise.

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